Glenn Mango Tree

Glenn Mango Tree
Images shown are of mature plants
Regular price $99.95 Sale price $99.95

1. Height:

  • 3 Gallon $99.95

Product Details

Growing Zones: 4-11 patio / 9-11 outdoors

(hardy down to 30℉) 
    
      4-11 patio
    
     / 
    
      9-11 outdoors
    
   Map 4-11 patio / 9-11 outdoors
Mature Height:
15-20 ft.
Mature Width:
8-10 ft.
Sunlight:
Full-Partial
Growth Rate:
Fast
Harvest Time:
June-July
Year to Bear:
Fruits 1st year!
Botanical Name:
Mangifera indica 'Glenn'
Does Not Ship To:
AZ

Product Description

Delicious Mangoes in Any Zone

Gorgeous growth with delectable taste that's second to none - the Glenn Mango is in a league of its own, especially since it's an abundant producer, both in containers and in the ground.

But what sets the Glenn Mango apart from the rest?

For starters, Glenn Mangoes can be grown anywhere in the country, effortlessly. And they can tolerate brief temperature drops down to 30 degrees once they're established. In colder areas, simply bring the tree indoors for the winter. It quickly grows to a manageable size - reaching 20 feet when planted outdoors but only 4 to 8 feet when grown in a container. 

Plus, with good looks and great taste, indoor growth is highly desirable. This exotic tree has vibrant green leaves and an aromatic scent that will enhance space - the perfect contrast against its vivid, vibrant orange-red hue. Also, the Glenn Mango is self-pollinating, which means it will produce fruit all by itself. Just place it by a sun-soaked, South-facing window and watch the growth take off.

What we love about the Glenn Mango: Your medium to large mangoes will be ready for harvesting from late June to July in its first year of growth. Seed-grown Mango Trees can take 6 to 8 years to produce fruit, but because we put in extra work to hand-graft your tree (adding a year or more to our own growing schedule), it's ready to go and grow. And with a firm texture, Glenn Mangoes are not as fibrous as most mango varieties, making them the perfect fruit for adding to desserts, salads or savory chutneys.  

Basically, you can save thousands of dollars and tons of time with the Glenn Mango - order your own today!

Pollination Info

Glenn Mango Tree Pollination

Glenn Mango Trees are self-fertile. You will get fruit with only one plant. However, adding an additional Glenn Mango Tree will drastically increase the size of your crop.

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Customer Reviews & Photos

Customer Reviews

Based on 66 reviews
5 ★
58% 
38
4 ★
18% 
12
3 ★
15% 
10
2 ★
2% 
1
1 ★
7% 
5
Customer Photos
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  • Reviews
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L
02/23/2019
Leona

Died after 7 months

I had great hopes for the two mango trees I bought. I kept them in my greenhouse the entire time and they did well right from the start, forming new leaves and growing in height. After I'd had them for about six months (January) they began to form blossoms. Then suddenly all the leaves and the trunk dried up and both abruptly died at the same time. No idea what I did wrong as I followed care and planting to the T.

02/26/2019
Fast-Growing-Trees.com

We hate hearing this! One of our customer care reps will be reaching out to you soon to see what may have happened and help get this resolved for you!

JD
12/16/2018
Joyce DePaul

So far so good.

Planted the Mango outdoors. Used all the recommended soils fertilizer etc. Its now drooping and getting a lot of rain today 12/16/18. I am leaving it where it is and hopefully in the spring it will enjoy the warmth and be used to the climate in Northern California. I won't give up on it. Thank you.

GS
12/16/2018
Gregory Sutton

Arrived rough but doing ok

My Glenn mango arrived in a bit of rough condition but is now stable and is looking good. Overall I'm glad I ordered my tree from FGT. Most of the leaves were green when the plant arrived but a good number looked damaged or wilted. The damaged leaves immediately fell off within a few days. I didn't panic I figured it would need to acclimate to its new home. I left it in its original pot to not shock it anymore and gave it consistent water but let it dry between. After a few weeks of looking stable I repotted it into a new pot. I probably could have waited a year since its roots hadn't filled much of the pot but it's looking good and green and seems to like the citrus/cactus soil I used. I haven't had a single new leaf grow yet but I read mangos have sudden growth spurts so I'll be parient. Hopefully by spring it will give me some new growth. While the plant is 4-5ft tall its still a whip so I'm not sure I'll get fruit the first year.

JZ
11/25/2018
Javier Zaldana

Very Happy

The plant was in excellent shape when delivered. The way they shipped it was excellent as well. The pot that plant was delivered in was way too small soil was very dry. They instructed me ahead of time to buy a larger pot for plant so it could be replanted ASAP.

ER
11/13/2018
Elena Ricevuto

Glenn Mango experiment in zone 9

Hi I received a perfectly healthy tree in October and planted it in the designated spot with the full sun right away. The tree took beautifully. We are in November now and I'm protecting my tree with the cover over the frame as the temperatures drop 40 or lower at night. I'm planning to keep it covered until spring. Fingers crossed!


Planting & Care

The Glenn Mango (Mangifera indica 'Glenn') is a fast growing, semi-dwarf tropical tree that produces delicious mangoes without taking up too much space. This full sun loving tropical tree is best suited for USDA growing zones 9-11 but can be successfully container grown for zones 4-11. When grown outside in more tropical areas, the mango can take cold snaps that drop as low as 30 degrees. One of the other advantages of the Glenn is that it is a self-fertile tree which means you can get fruit with just the one but have a more bountiful harvest with two nearby one another.

Location: Direct sunlight and lots of warmth are a mango’s best friend. When choosing a location, whether in a container or in the ground, try to choose a place with the most hours of sunlight possible. If the container will be indoors, place it near a window. When choosing a location in the ground, avoid low areas or areas that tend to flood. Mangoes like to be on higher, drier ground for better drainage.

Planting Directions (in ground):
1) Once you have chosen the best spot for your tree, dig a hole that’s three times as wide as the pot your tree came in, and just as deep. Take a pitchfork or shovel and loosen the soil around the sides of the hole. Remove any debris, like dirt clumps, grass, or rocks.
2) Carefully remove the tree from its plastic container and gently comb through the root ball to free up the roots.
3) Position your tree in the hole, and make sure that it’s level with the surrounding ground, and that it is standing straight up.
4) Back fill the hole and tamp down with your hands as you go to avoid any air pockets from forming.
5) When you have finished, water the planting site generously and then broadcast mulch around the base to conserve soil moisture and combat any competing weeds that try to grow around the tree. Avoid letting the mulch touch the trunk of the tree or fungus and rot may set in.
*Tip: Mangoes prefer loose sandy soil that is on the acidic side. To achieve this, mix a little sand into the hole along with a bag of acidic planting mix. The acidic planting mix will have lots of potassium to make your mangoes taste more flavorful!

Planting Directions (potted):
1) Select a pot that has multiple drainage holes in the bottom and is 2 sizes bigger than what the mango initially arrived in.
2) Fill in the open pot space around the root system with a quality potting mix that has a light acidic side to it.
3) Tamp down the potting soil as you would if the tree was planted in the ground to prevent any air pockets from forming.
4) Water the mango well so the soil has been evenly moistened and allow the soil to settle.
5) Ensure the tree is in a very sunny location as this tree does need full sun to thrive. 6-8+ hours each day is best for the exposure.

Watering: Mangoes are rarely ever thirsty but for their first two weeks of establishing, they MUST be watered every day. The most common mistake that gardeners make with this tree is over watering. For the first 6 weeks after planting, water only once every three days. After that you can back off to once a week and then every two weeks over the winter. During the hot months of summer your tree may need a bit more water than over the spring or fall. Potted mangos will need watering on a daily basis as well at first. After the 1st two weeks, water whenever the top 2 inches of the soil is dry to the touch.

Fertilizer: DO NOT USE CHEMICAL FERTILIZER! Mangoes are easily burnt by fertilizers high in ammonium nitrate. The best fertilizer is a natural, organic one with mycorrhizal fungi and beneficial bacteria. A little gardening secret that Indians used to do that works wonders on mangoes, bury a fish touching the roots of your plant. The fish contains lots of nutrient crucial to a mango in its first years. Potted mangos will benefit from a balanced fertilizer formula such as a 10-10-10 while actively growing. Cut back on feeding the tree nitrogen in flowering period, instead provide a boost of phosphorus and potassium.

Weed Control: Weeds steal vital nutrients from the plants around them. The best way to keep weeds at bay and help your tree grow is with pine bark. Placing a one-inch thick layer three feet around the base of your tree will stop the weeds. Also another bonus is as the pine bark decomposes, it will raise the acidity of your soil naturally!

Pruning: On a mango tree the fruit forms at the ends of the branches. Because pruning causes the tree to put on more lateral branches, pruning will give you more mangoes. Mangoes are very forgiving so don’t be afraid to prune them, but don’t go crazy and scalp the thing. Your goal when pruning should be to form an open crown so that light and air can penetrate to the middle of the tree. This will reduce the risk of fungus and diseases. The best time of year to prune your mango tree is right after the harvest; but in cooler areas you will be better off pruning just before the mango starts to flower. Some light pruning of the potted mango is good. These trees do not typically require a lot of pruning, just be sure to remove dead, damaged or diseased branches to help control the tree’s shape.

Pollination: Mangoes are excellent self-pollinators and will produce fruit by themselves. If you want to double your yield it is recommended to plant a second mango and encourage bees and other pollinators to come to your trees.


Shipping Details

Most items ship the next business day unless otherwise noted

Estimated Shipping Time: Most orders ship immediately, however some orders may ship in 1-2 business days (we do not ship on the weekends) from date of purchase. As noted on the website, some items are seasonal, and may only ship in spring or fall. Once your order is shipped, you'll receive an email with a tracking number.

Amount of Order Shipping Charge
Less than $15 $11.95
$15.00-$23.99 $13.95
$24.00-$39.99 $16.95
$40.00-$79.99 $19.95
$80.00-$98.99 $24.95
$99.00-$124.99 $29.95
$125-$148.99 $34.99
$149 & above Free Shipping!

Shipping Alert:

You can still order, but due to cold weather, we have delayed shipping to the areas shaded on the map below. We want your new plant to thrive right out of the box, so we will wait on shipping your order until the weather is ideal. This includes anyone in Growing Zones 3, 4, 5 or 6. If you are unsure of your growing zone, visit our Growing Zone Finder.

We will resume normal shipping in the Spring. Please see the table below for your approximate ship date.

Zone Map
Growing Zone Shipping Resumes
Zones 3 & 4 Week of April 29th
Zones 5 Week of April 14th
Zones 6 Week of April 7th
Zones 7-11 Ships Now!

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