Fig Trees

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 items

Sold Out Chicago Hardy Fig Tree
Chicago Hardy Fig Tree

Sunlight: Full-Partial

Growth Rate: Moderate

Harvest Time: July-October

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386 reviews
Growing Zones: 5-10
Up to 22% off Little Miss Figgy™ Tree
Little Miss Figgy™ Tree

Sunlight: Full Sun

Growth Rate: Moderate

Harvest Time: August

Starting at $49.95

186 reviews
Growing Zones: 7-11
Up to 28% off LSU Purple Fig Tree
LSU Purple Fig Tree

Sunlight: Full Sun

Growth Rate: Fast

Harvest Time: July-October

Starting at $49.95

96 reviews
Growing Zones: 7-10
Up to 40% off Brown Turkey Fig
Brown Turkey Fig

Sunlight: Full-Partial

Growth Rate: Moderate

Harvest Time: June

Starting at $59.97

149 reviews
Growing Zones: 7-10
Up to 12% off Black Mission Fig
Black Mission Fig

Sunlight: Full-Partial

Growth Rate: Moderate

Harvest Time: June - September

Starting at $69.95

107 reviews
Growing Zones: 7-10
Celeste Fig Tree

Sunlight: Full Sun

Growth Rate: Fast

Harvest Time: July

Starting at $89.95

77 reviews
Growing Zones: 7-11
Fignomenal Fig Tree

Sunlight: Full-Partial

Growth Rate: Moderate

Harvest Time: June - September

Starting at $59.95

5 reviews
Growing Zones: 8-11 outdoors
Sold Out Desert King Fig Tree
Desert King Fig Tree

Sunlight: Full Sun

Growth Rate: Fast

Harvest Time: July-August

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4 reviews
Growing Zones: 6-10
Sold Out Chicago Hardy Fig Tree - USDA Organic
Chicago Hardy Fig Tree - USDA Organic

Sunlight: Full Sun

Growth Rate: Moderate

Harvest Time: July - October

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13 reviews
Growing Zones: 5-10
Sold Out Assorted Figs - USDA Organic
Assorted Figs - USDA Organic

Sunlight: Full Sun

Growth Rate: Moderate

Harvest Time: July - October

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1 review
Growing Zones: 5-10
Sold Out Little Miss Figgy™ Tree - USDA Organic
Little Miss Figgy™ Tree - USDA Organic

Sunlight: Full Sun

Growth Rate: Moderate

Harvest Time: August

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1 review
Growing Zones: 7-11
Sold Out Yellow Fig Tree
Yellow Fig Tree

Sunlight: Full Sun

Growth Rate: Moderate

Harvest Time: July - September

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2 reviews
Growing Zones: 7-11

First to fruit with multiple harvests a year.


The intensely nutritious fig is one of a kind. Besides its creamy texture, subtle hints of berry with undertones of vanilla flavor, this age-old fruit is packed with more than a decadent taste. According to the American Diabetes Association, figs are high in fiber and help to promote functional control of diabetes, and its leaves can reduce insulin requirements, too. This fruit tree will not only surprise you with its hardiness and many luxurious culinary capabilities, it can also add a touch of character to any area where you let her stand gracefully.
Type of Fig: Celeste Fig
Growing Zone 7-11 outdoors
Harvest July to August
Year to Bear First year
Annual Growth 3 feet
Spacing 10 feet
Full or Partial Sun Full Sun: 6 to 8 hours
Characteristics Also known as the Sugar Fig. Small to medium-sized fruit with a sweet flavor comparable to candy. Brown and violet skin with a strawberry pink flesh.
Type of Fig: Black Mission Fig
Growing Zone 7-10 outdoors
Harvest June to September
Year to Bear First year
Annual Growth 2 feet
Spacing 3 to 5 feet
Full or Partial Sun Full Sun: 6 to 8 hours
Characteristics Medium-sized fruit with hints of strawberry, melon and banana flavors and a jammy dark pink textured flesh. Blackish-purple skin.
Type of Fig: Black Mission Fig
Growing Zone 7-10 outdoors
Harvest June to September
Year to Bear First year
Annual Growth 2 feet
Spacing 3 to 5 feet
Full or Partial Sun Full Sun: 6 to 8 hours
Characteristics Medium-sized fruit with hints of strawberry, melon and banana flavors and a jammy dark pink textured flesh. Blackish-purple skin.
Type of Fig: Brown Turkey Fig
Growing Zone 7-10 outdoors
Harvest June
Year to Bear First year
Annual Growth 2 feet
Spacing 10 to 20 feet apart
Full or Partial Sun Full/Partial Sun: 4 to 8 hours
Characteristics Brownish-dark purple with a sweet flavor and a light red flesh that has few seeds.
Type of Fig: Chicago Hardy Fig
Growing Zone 5-10 outdoors
Harvest July to October
Year to Bear First year
Annual Growth 2 feet
Spacing 5 to 10 feet
Full or Partial Sun Full/Partial Sun: 4 to 8 hours
Characteristics Medium to small-sized fruit that's richly flavored, with an amber-colored flesh and dark mahogany skin.
Type of Fig: LSU Purple Fig
Growing Zone 7-10 outdoors
Harvest July to October
Year to Bear First year
Annual Growth 2 feet
Spacing 10 feet
Full or Partial Sun Full Sun: 6 to 8 hours
Characteristics Purple outside with a red-colored, mildly sweet flesh.
Type of Fig: Little Miss Figgy Tree
Growing Zone 7-11 outdoors
Harvest August
Year to Bear First year
Annual Growth 2 feet
Spacing 10 feet
Full or Partial Sun Full Sun: 6 to 8 hours
Characteristics Medium-sized fruit with a sweet flavor. Strawberry red flesh and dark purple skin.

How to Plant Fig Trees

Whether you’re planting your Fig Trees indoors or outdoors, select an area that receives 6 hours of sunlight or more per day. Also, areas with well-drained soil are ideal for Fig Trees.

How to Grow Fig Trees

First, make sure to transfer the plant from the pot it was shipped in into a new one. The container should be twice the size of the root ball, to leave room for establishment, and has to have drainage holes on the bottom.
After you've planted, establish a regular watering schedule. The easiest way to tell if your tree is thirsty is by sticking your finger into the soil. If the soil is dry, then it’s time for watering. If it’s moist, then it’s good to go.
To help the roots get established in the ground, dig your hole two to three times the size of the root ball. Your outdoor fig won’t require as many waterings as those planted in containers. Water your tree at least once or twice a week. This will promote growth and help the roots get established. After the first year, it will not require as many waterings.

When to Prune Fig Trees, Pollination and More

Though our figs are self-fertile, meaning it can bear plenty of fruit without a pollinator, figs go through a unique process when it comes to pollination. Because figs are not fruit, but inverted flowers, they cannot depend on the wind or bees to spread their pollen. This intensely nutritious flower is filled with an assortment of unopened blooms that line the inner walls of its velvety skin. The only way that a fig can be pollinated is by microscopic wasps called fig wasps.

When you prune, wait until the dormant season and use sterilized clean shears. Only prune after fruiting and make your cuts at a 45-degree angle.

Because our plants are grafted, you can skip the boring part and get straight to the results. Instead of two years, you may get fruit within the first year! You’ll know your figs are ready to be harvested once they droop, soften, and change color. Unlike most fruit, figs do not ripen off the tree. So, it’s important to examine your figs first before picking.