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  • Debutante Camellia for Sale

*images shown are of mature plants

Debutante Camellia

Camellia japonica 'Debutante'

$39.95 (10% Off)

1. Size

  • Ships week of Apr 2

2. Quantity

3. Extras

-t- Planting Mix
Debutante Camellia Planting Mix

Helps your Debutante Camellia get established in a fraction of the time, become more drought tolerant, and grow faster. Here's how:

Beneficial Bacteria... It's like a Probiotic for your tree... creating an explosion of fine hair roots that vastly improves nutrient and water uptake.

Course Organic Compost... loosens and improves all types of soils while promoting proper pH levels. You get better drainage and moisture retention.

Microbial Fertilizers... including Sea Kelp, Yucca, and 100 other elements proven to gently feed your tree without burning the roots.

Use 1 bag of Planting Mix for each plant ordered.

Soil Contents
-t- Root Rocket™ Fertilizer
Root Rocket™ Transplant Fertilizer

2oz. Packet

Get your new plants off to the right start by using Root Rocket™ Transplant.

This soil amendment contains 16 strains of mycorrhizal fungi, biostimulants, beneficial bacteria and Horta-Sorb® water management gel.

Simply sprinkle the product into the planting hole adjacent to the root ball when planting.

The organisms will start to work right away supplying the roots with much needed nutrition.

The specially formulated Horta-Sorb® will reduce transplant stress and aid in water retention.

1 packet per plant

Root Rocket Fertilizer
Add A Decorative Pot

Growing Zones: 7-9
(hardy down to 10℉)

Growing Zones 7-9
You are in Growing Zone: 6

Mature Height:

15 ft.

Mature Width:

8 ft.


Partial Sun


8-10 ft.

Growth Rate:


Drought Tolerance:


Botanical Name:

Camellia japonica 'Debutante'

Does Not Ship To:


Full - Pink Blooms Every Spring

Debutante Camellias Show Off Pink Blossoms in Early Spring

- Impressive 4 inch pink blooms
- Evergreen foliage makes it perfect for privacy screens
- Drought tolerant and easy to grow

An impressive sight to any garden enthusiast is the beautiful Debutante Camellia. Large, explosive blooms cover this shrub in early spring... lasting for months.

These blooms put on a display that is sure to get the neighbors' attention.

This shrub also makes a great hedge or privacy screen, blocking out unsightly areas such as homes, construction or roads.

Camellias may appear delicate and frail and finicky because of their incredibly beautiful and fragrant flowers. The truth? They are easy to grow, and require little attention to reach full maturity and longevity.

Plant the Debutante Camellia at any time of year and receive her fragrant blossoms in your garden!

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Customer Reviews

4.9 / 5.0
7 Reviews
5 Stars
4 Stars
3 Stars
2 Stars
1 Stars
I lived in Northern Virginia (zone 7) with the dreaded clay soil. What a marvelous camellia. It didn't require special care and kept blooming and blooming. This is a winner!
January 1, 2013
The plant arrived in beautiful condition. Unfortunately there was some deer damage from last fall but the remaining blooms were good size and quite beautiful this spring.
January 1, 2013
over 6 years ago
I love this plant. I have 2 in the windows of my art studio to see these blooms. I just wish they were blooming more throughout the year.
September 8, 2015
over 4 years ago
Growing Zone:
beautiful color
this tree is gorgeous in bloom and attractive with just foliage. hardy through a rare freeze here, just had a few frostbitten blooms and some yellow leaves. came right back after the freeze and is very green and full this spring.
May 3, 2016
camden, SC
over 2 years ago
Growing Zone:
The bushes don't grow as fast as I hoped but when it blooms, it is unbelievably beautiful. They are still the same height as they were 2 years ago,
User submitted image
Added Aug 12, 2017
August 12, 2017
Growing Zone:
My first debutante was given to me in 1950. I had to leave it when I moved to Florida. Now I am starting over and this new one is surviving beautifuly.
September 17, 2016
Fernandina Beach, FL
1 year ago
Growing Zone:
too early to rate butbplanting seemed strong
this seems like a sturdy planting. it is too early to ssy ifbit will grow and bloom. i hope so. canelias ate rigged sttong plants usually.
October 25, 2017
6 months ago
Growing Zone:

Planting & Care

It's Easy to Plant & Care for Your Debutante Camellia

Debutante Camellia Planting Diretions

The Debutante Camellia (Camellia japonica 'Debutante') is an easy to grow, drought tolerant shrub that is an impressive sight in the early spring with beautiful, large pink blooms that last for months. When planted in sequence, their evergreen foliage makes a great hedge or privacy screen and will surround your property in a delightful fragrance. The Debutante is best suited for USDA growing zones 7-9 but can also be grown in a pot and brought indoors for the colder seasons. This partial sun loving shrub matures to a height of 15 feet tall and 8 feet wide which means they can be planted in more compact areas and with their adaptability, can easily flourish in a wide range of soils.

Choosing a location: They are very deer resistant and come in a wonderful range of different sizes, forms and colors. Although they can be a bit finicky with their requirements for planting, they’re fairly easy to grow.

Planting directions (in ground): It’s always good to test your soil with a pH meter before planting anything that requires more acidity to flourish.

1) Select a planting site where the soil is well draining and no standing water collects. Remember, camellias are susceptible to root rot. Afternoon shade is good to protect the camellia from getting too hot during the warmer months.
2) Camellias need a slightly more acidic soil to thrive; specifically a 6.0-6.5 pH is ideal. If you need to raise the acidity of your soil then mix in some peat moss, pine needles, lime, coffee grounds or decaying oak leaves.
3) Also, provide more nutrients by adding peat moss, compost or humus to the soil before planting. As they break down they will feed the camellia’s root system.
4) Dig your hole about 2 inches shorter than the depth of the root ball and 2 feet wider than the width. This will allow space for the roots to branch out and keep the top of the root ball above the rim of the hole. Loosen up the soil at the bottom of the hole with a gardening claw or rake in order to make it easier for the roots to expand.
5) Place your camellia on top of the loosened soil, the top of your root ball should poke out of the hole slightly. Carefully back-fill your hole with the enriched soil until the root system is completely covered and mound the soil over the top. Press down gently on the topsoil to stabilize your camellia.
6) Make a circular ridge of soil 2-3 feet away from the shrub and press down firmly to keep your soil from washing away.
7) Water thoroughly but do not leave your shrub in standing water. You’ll want to water regularly at first until the roots become better established, then soak once a week to encourage deeper root growth (camellia roots tend to stay more towards the surface). Adding mulch around your camellia will help the soil retain moisture, regulate temperature and prevent weeds from growing.

Planting directions (potted): Your camellias will thrive in pots but may require a little extra care for them to grow and flower. They will require repotting every 2-3 years since the soil will become depleted and heavy after about 3 years.

1) Your container will need to have adequate drainage since camellias hate to have wet feet. Lining the bottom of your container with 2-3 inches of gravel will help keep your roots from getting waterlogged. Also, make sure that the bottom of the container has drainage holes.
2) Different types of soil affect how quickly water drains. Instead of slow draining gardening soil, use a fast-draining soil mix that’s specific for container use. Amend commercial mixes with finely composted pine tree bark or similar organic materials to make a good planting medium.
3) When potting your camellia be sure not to plant it any deeper than it was in the original container it came in. You’ll want to avoid covering any surface roots, as this can be disastrous. Leave your soil level a couple inches lower than the rim of your pot.

Watering:Feel the soil under the layer of mulch every few days. If the soil is dry then gently give your camellia a few gallons of water, allow the water to soak into the soil as you pour. If you planted in the warmer season you may need to monitor the moisture every day. In cooler, moist weather you may not need to water for weeks. During the blooming season increase the watering a bit to encourage fuller blossoms.

Always be cautious of your watering habits though, waterlogging can lead to root rot, which can be lethal to your camellia. Potted camellias should be watered as needed. Using your finger, probe the soil to see how moist it is. Always allow your soil surface to become dry before watering but don’t wait to the point of drought stress. Water until you see water draining from the bottom of the pot.

Fertilizing: Fertilize your camellia in the spring. Do not fertilize sick or distressed camellias or when temperatures are above 90 degrees because this can result in leaf burning. Using a soluble fertilizer for acid loving plants once or twice a month in spring and mid-summer is best.

A slow release fertilizer such as Osmocote or Dynamite is useful if you would like to fertilize your camellia less frequently. Another method is to use liquid fertilizer for acid loving plants, which is applied while watering or spraying in the growing season. The labels on each of the fertilizers will show you how much fertilizer to apply based on the size of your plant.

Pruning: After your blooming season has ended you’ll want to remove any dead or weak wood (a gray tinge to the bark is an easy way to identify dead branches). Thin out the growth a bit when your camellias become so dense that blooms will have difficulty emerging. Shorten lower limbs to encourage more upright growth and make scrawny shrubs a lot bushier. Prune the thick area on the stems, which will mark where the prior year’s growth ended.

Pruning above the growth scar will help motivate dormant buds to form below. Remove crossing branches to avoid scraping wounds, your camellia should be pruned to the point where a bird can fly freely through it. Thinning the center of the canopy improves air circulation, which prevents sooty mold and petal blight.

Prune your potted camellia’s stems back hard in the spring season after flowering. The buds form on the tips of the newer branches and pruning your potted camellia will keep them a more manageable size and will encourage more branching.

Planting & Care

Questions & Answers

Start typing your question and we'll check if it was already asked and answered. Learn More
Browse 11 questions Browse 11 questions and 31 answers
Why did you choose this? Store
Tree is pretty to look at and has a wonderful aroma!
First Name L on Feb 28, 2018
Love the color
Connie B on Feb 6, 2018
Tree is pretty to look at and has a wonderful aroma!
First Name L on Feb 28, 2018
Wife wanted for Valentine's Day.
Daniel H on Feb 9, 2018
Love the color
Connie B on Feb 6, 2018
The beautiful color, it's an evergreen, the size at maturity and it's hardiness.
Victoria H on Oct 29, 2017
Doing well ,pleased with its growth.
Ethel M on Mar 22, 2017
Flower is a beautiful graceful color
Sylvie S on Mar 9, 2017
I love the dainty quality of the flower. The petals remind me of a ruffled dress. The color is absolutely beautiful.
Elvia C on Mar 1, 2017
For the flowering time to add color during the late winter and early spring time frame and the potential size this plant can get to.
Kenneth G on Feb 14, 2017
Fragrance, shade loving that blooms in winter.
Janet O on Mar 4, 2016
PATRICIA S on Feb 26, 2016
I have 13 varieties of Camellias this is one of them
Rick L on Sep 16, 2015
I like the flower and it can lives in my area.
Ying W on Sep 11, 2015
Wife wanted for Valentine's Day.
Daniel H on Feb 9, 2018
The beautiful color, it's an evergreen, the size at maturity and it's hardiness.
Victoria H on Oct 29, 2017
Will camellia tolerate clay soil?
Tom R on Nov 13, 2014
BEST ANSWER: Camellias like good drainage which heavy clay does not provide. If you have heavy clay, it would be best to amend it with plenty of organic matter (decayed leaves is great and adds to the acidity of the soil, which Camellias like), and be sure not too plant too deep. The top of the soil in the pot should be level or even slightly higher than the level of the ground soil when you are through planting. If you have a raised bed, that would be a good place to plant your Camellia, too.
why doesn't my Camellia bloom. ??
M j on Apr 20, 2015
BEST ANSWER: There are a number of reasons a Camellia isn't blooming. The buds for Debutante form in late spring and open in fall, so if you let your bush get dry, particularly in late summer, the buds can abort. Over fertilizing can also cause buds to drop, and your shrub might have a fungal disease that is making the buds fail. You can contact your local Extension Agent to help decide what your problem is; they are familiar with local conditions and and can visit on-site to determine what is causing your buds to fail and suggest remedies for the problem.
Is this fragrant? How long does it take to grow tall?
A shopper on Jun 27, 2014
BEST ANSWER: We bought 10+ Debutante Camellia last spring.
They all survive last extreme cold weather in South Washington
and healthy. But they grow slow (about 4" taller), but we believe
the coming year they shall grow faster as once those trees established
in the first. There were few flowers but we are not sure they were fragrant.
Does this plant have thorns?
Rhonda on Aug 14, 2017
BEST ANSWER: No thorns. I lived in Atlanta, GA when I received my first one, and it bloomed and bloomed wonderfully. I cut and gave away all the time. I loved it. It got so tall that without asking for advice I just cut the top off. Fortunately it did not mind. I left it when I moved and I understand it is still prospering. I finally decided I had to have another one, so I ordered and it is doing OK here.
How fast does this variety reach 8 feet? Would get very little sun where I would plant.
Jean B on Jan 23, 2016
BEST ANSWER: I bought this tree in April 2015. In this short period of time, the tree has not gained any height. It is next to border fence and under shade of Poplar tree, so I did not expect much growth. It had several beautiful buds but the surprisingly severe NC weather this year caused the buds to fall off before reaching full bloom. I have high expectations for next year. The tree is covered in ice at this tie, but leaves are still green. I believe it will survive this cold blast.
Is this the type of camellia that is an evergreen?
Judith S on May 7, 2015
BEST ANSWER: My camellia is currently encased in ice, but the leaves remain green.
May I still plant trees in this hot summer time?
A shopper on Jul 9, 2014
BEST ANSWER: If temperatures aren't scorching hot, in the 90's or above you can go head and plant the Debutante Camellia.
I live in Albuquerque NM, WHICH camellia grows here?
Victoria F on Feb 3, 2018
BEST ANSWER: The growing zones are 7-9. Click the link to look up what growing zone you are in.
Why don't you ship this plant to TX? I live in Central TX and am looking to find evergreen shrubs that can provide both privacy (from staying thick green all the time) and beauty (from long-lasting blooms/flowers). Any other plants you can suggest?
Texindo on Oct 2, 2015
BEST ANSWER: Thank you for your interest in our Debutante Camellia. Due to the agricultural restrictions in Texas we are unable to ship this plant to you from South Carolina.
can you container grow them?
Rex V on Jun 30, 2015
BEST ANSWER: Yes, this shrub adapts well to being grown in a container. You will need a fast-draining, acidic potting medium, preferably one with composted bark rather than a peat based mix. The roots in a container can suffer damage if the soil in the pot freezes, so if you have night temperatures below 20-25 degrees F., you might need to protect your pot or bring it into a garage until night temperatures are higher. If you need to overwinter your Camellia indoors, it will need plenty of cool, direct sunlight. Plant your Camellia in a container a couple of inches larger than the root ball, and replant every couple of years, increasing the size of the pot as the plant gets larger. Do not plant it any deeper than it was in the last pot, as its roots need to be near the surface. Your pot should have excellent drainage, preferably with several drainage holes as Camellias cannot tolerate wet feet, and you should let the pot dry out for the top couple of inches before watering.

Shipping Details

Most items ship the next business day unless otherwise noted

Estimated Shipping Time: Most orders ship immediately, however some orders may ship in 1-2 business days (we do not ship on the weekends) from date of purchase. As noted on the website, some items are seasonal, and may only ship in spring or fall. Once your order is shipped, you'll receive an email with a tracking number.

Shipping Alert:

Due to cold weather, we have suspended shipping to the areas that are shaded on the map below. Please view the diagram to determine if your area has been affected. This includes anyone in Growing Zones 3, 4, 5 or 6. If you are unsure of your growing zone, visit our Growing Zone Finder.

We will resume normal shipping in the Spring. Please see the table below for your approximate ship date.

Zone Map


Shipping Resumes

Zones 3 & 4

Week of Apr 30th

Zones 5

Week of Apr 16th

Zones 6

Week of Mar 26th

Zones 7-11

Ships Now!

Shipping Cost

Amount of Order


Less than $15











32% of order