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  • Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate for Sale

    Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate for Sale

    Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate for Sale

    Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate for Sale

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Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate

Punica granatum

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Growing Zones: 6-11
(hardy down to 0℉)



Growing Zones 6-11
You are in Growing Zone: 6

Mature Height:

8-10 ft.

Mature Width:

8-10 ft.

Sunlight:

Full Sun

Growth Rate:

Fast

Drought Tolerance:

Moderate

Harvest Time:

September

Fruit Color:

Orange Red

Year to Bear:

Fruits 1st Year!

Chill Hours (minimum):

100-200

You are in an area with ~1800 chill hours

Botanical Name:

Punica granatum

Does Not Ship To:

AZ

90-100 lbs of Pomegranates & Thrives almost Everywhere!

Russian Red is the best Pomegranate for the North, but also most of the South! Organic fruit orchards from Florida all the way up to Pennsylvania are amazed at how tough and trouble-free this tree is.

You get reliable fruit harvests in good years and bad. There are several Poms that will grow in Northern climates. Problem is... most are early bloomers. They can set fruit, only to be wiped out by sporadic late freezes. Many Southern states are prone to this as well.

Russian Red flowers later so you don't have to worry about late freezes. Thrives in zones 6-11. But will also produce in mild zone 6 areas that are protected from harsh winds. Far Northern states (zones 3-5) can plant their Poms in pots and bring indoors for the winter.

One of the Biggest harvests of any Pomegranate Tree. A mature tree can produce up to 90-100 lbs under good conditions (your results may vary). So with very little space you get plenty of fruit to eat, share, and juice.

Enjoy the health benefits of your Pomegranates all year long. Eat fresh fruit over 4 months in the fall and freeze the juice for the remainder of the year. Plant a hedge row, of Russian Reds, every 8 ft along your property border, so you'll never run out. At $3.00 a pound for organic pomegranates, you could trim them into a highly lucrative privacy fence.

One of the best tasting Pomegranates. Many people mistake Russian Red fruit for the Wonderful variety found in grocery stores. If you're a Pom Connoisseur you'll find Russian Red to be slightly sweeter.

Bigger fruit means less work. Russian Reds are large... about the size of a Grapefruit. So you get a lot more arils for the same effort. Up until now, the 'easy to grow' varieties have tended to have small fruit and not much of it.

A No-Fuss Tree that stands up to High Humidity. Fungus is the arch enemy of pomegranates. Unusually heavy weeks of rain in spring or late summer can cause problems for many poms. This can happen in most areas of the country and happens almost every year in the South-Eastern states. Russian Red is highly tolerant of humidity.

This is the closest you can come to Plant It... Forget It... Pick It. A remarkably tough tree that also resists insects, disease, drought and fruit splitting. Prefers full sun but can tolerate partial shade. Adapts to almost any soil, even poor ones as long as they drain well (avoid consistently soggy areas).

You need only one Russian Red to produce fruit, but you'll greatly increase production with a second. This is a must if you're going to get close to 90-100 lbs per tree per year. You can cross pollinate with additional Russian Reds or Wonderfuls.

Order Now before we sell out for the season. This tree is growing in popularity with organic orchards who buy in large numbers. We recommend that you place your order before we sell out for the season.





Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate Pollination

Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate are self-fertile. You will get fruit with only one plant. However, adding an additional Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate will drastically increase the size of your crop.

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Customer Reviews

4.1 / 5.0
53 Reviews
5 Stars
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1 Stars
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Nice Plants
They arrived well packed and looking healthy. We planted them immediately and one started putting on new leaves in just a couple of days. Since they were planted about a week ago we will need to give them time to judge their growth rate and if they are hardy enough to tolerate the cold North Georgia winters
October 6, 2015
Purchased
over 2 years ago
Beautiful tree
We live in Western North Carolina, on the very top of a mountain where our winters are often brutal. If our tree makes it, I'll happily order several more. Our Pomegranate tree arrived a couple of days ago, and it was well-packed and hydrated. It looked very healthy, and there were many leaves on the tree as well. I was quite surprised at the size of the tree, since it was larger than I thought it would be. It also had small red flowers on it. I can't wait to see how it does. I can't judge the growth rate or hardiness just yet, but will keep you informed.
April 7, 2016
Growing Zone:
6
Arrived in excellent condition. Now thriving.
Arrived healthy in good condition. Both adjusted to full sun immediately and are already sending out new growth. They will be going into the ground soon. Zone 6B.
On the day they arrived before being planted outside.
On the day they arrived before being planted outside.
July 23, 2016
Lowell, AR
Purchased
1 year ago
Growing Zone:
6
Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate
I bought this tree and was shipped together with a Lemon tree. It arrived fast, well secured and packaged. It had the right ordered size with very healthy and vibrant leaves. I've already planted it in ground and hope it will continue to grow, bare fruits, and survive our growing zone 6 weather. This is my 3rd tree ordered from this reputable nursery and I surely recommend it to all. I'm so far 100% satisfied.
July 27, 2016
Bridgewater, NJ
Purchased
1 year ago
Growing Zone:
6
The pomegranate tree you sent me
So far this tree is doing very well. It has even produced a couple of blooms. Even during transportation it remained intact, also due to the fact that you take all kinds of pains to pack the plants adequately. Thank you for your wonderful service.
April 27, 2016
Savannah, GA
Purchased
1 year ago
Growing Zone:
8
Super pomegranat.
Thank you very much ,shipping very good, pomegranat plant looks super, ivery hoppy.
April 25, 2016
Spokane, WA
Purchased
1 year ago
Growing Zone:
5
Beautifull tree and healthy . I am so happy . Thanks
User submitted image
Added Aug 16, 2016
August 16, 2016
43040, OH
Purchased
1 year ago
Growing Zone:
6
Pleasantly surprised!
Recently received my Cold Hardy Russian Pomegranate in the mail. I was pleased with the size and how pretty this tree is. So far, so good. I am excited to see if it will have fruit on it this year. I ordered a 5-in-1 pear tree, a 5-in-1 apple tree and an apricot tree last year and this year they are so much fuller and had so many blossoms. It takes about a year for a tree to get established, and I am certain that a year from now my wonderful pomegranate will be even more beautiful.
May 4, 2016
Port Washington, NY
Purchased
1 year ago
Growing Zone:
7
Plant looks healthy and good
Plant looks very healthy and arrived to my doorstep in excellent condition. Not yet planted in my yard , will do so in late fall. I can't judge its growth or hardiness at this point, but will review it in next fall 2017. I am in Growing Zone 7B.
July 25, 2016
GA
Purchased
1 year ago
Growing Zone:
7
Good so far
I bought this plant three weeks ago. It has new leaves and survived in hot temperatures up to 83F. Happy with the plant. Thank you fast growing trees.com for your good service.
May 19, 2016
Canton, GA
Purchased
1 year ago
Growing Zone:
7

Planting & Care



It's Easy to Plant & Care for Your Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate



Step 1: Dig Your Hole


Select a site with full to partial sun and moist or well drained soil for your Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate.

First, dig each hole so that it is just shallower than the root ball and at least twice the width.

Then loosen the soil in the planting hole so the roots can easily break through.

Use your shovel or try dragging the points of a pitch fork along the sides and bottom of the hole.

Planting & Care

Step 2: Place Your Plant


Next, separate the roots of your Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate gently with your fingers and position them downward in the hole.

The top of the root flare, where the roots end and the trunk begins, should be about an inch above the surrounding soil.

Then make sure the plant is exactly vertical in the hole.

To make it just right, use a level.

Step 3: Backfill Your Hole


As you backfill the hole, apply water to remove air pockets.

Remove debris like stones and grass and completely break up any dirt clumps.

Water your Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate again after the transplant is complete.


Questions & Answers

Start typing your question and we'll check if it was already asked and answered. Learn More
Browse 26 questions Browse 26 questions and 92 answers
Why did you choose this?
Fast-Growing-Trees.com Store
I love pomegranates, and when a saw there was a cold hardy variety that was supposedly sweeter than the POM pomegranates, I couldn't resist. I purchased several, and am looking forward to them growing and producing lots of fruit.
Ryan M on Aug 9, 2017
Wanted to try a different variety. It flowers but doesn't set fruit
James Michael J on Jul 20, 2017
I love pomegranates, and when a saw there was a cold hardy variety that was supposedly sweeter than the POM pomegranates, I couldn't resist. I purchased several, and am looking forward to them growing and producing lots of fruit.
Ryan M on Aug 9, 2017
Can grow in container
Olga G on Aug 1, 2017
Wanted to try a different variety. It flowers but doesn't set fruit
James Michael J on Jul 20, 2017
I love pomegranates and when I read that they will grow where I live, I just had to plant one.
George S on Jul 11, 2017
Wanted to grow my own Pomegranates.
Hilda I on Jul 11, 2017
We think we have a prefect place along side of our house for trees that produces good fruit. Hoping the pomegranate will do well.
George L. B on Jul 9, 2017
I love pomegranates, but they're extremely expensive and only available for a limited time. I love the idea of growing my own!
Sarah M on Jul 7, 2017
Because most of my family loves pomegranates, and because pomegranates are becoming so expensive. We think it would be better to have a pomegranate tree.
Isabelle Z on Jul 7, 2017
CROSSING THE WONDERFUL
Karon F on Jun 30, 2017
It's hard to find fruit trees for my zone. Also, I'm a newbie at gardening and this seems like a fuss-free tree
vidya s on Jun 30, 2017
unique health benefits
Andrew W on Jun 25, 2017
Love Pomegranates, and they are hard to find, especially in ripe condition. Plus it survives in my zone. $3 for one is not uncommon, and when you really need one, it seems like you never find it.
Ayora on Jun 24, 2017
We were looking for something unusual to plant in our front yard which gets full afternoon sun year round. It will be planted in the space between our house and our great neighbors. Hopefully we will all enjoy its beauty very soon.
Linda M on Jun 20, 2017
Perfect Father's Day gift.
Alanna K on Jun 18, 2017
I love Pomegranate. I'm in Zone 6 and got so excited to learn that I could grow this tree.
Vivian E on Jun 12, 2017
family request
Glenda C on Jun 12, 2017
for the fruit
Brian D on Jun 11, 2017
Pomegranate is getting expense so I chose to grow it myself because of its flavor and nutrients.
Darwin L on May 25, 2017
Zone 7 , Popular fruit
Lori N on May 24, 2017
It was a birthday present for someone who absolutely loves pomegranates, but lives in a cold zone. Not to mention that she has birds which would love them as well. The description promised large and abundant fruits which I am sure she would love.
Samantha S on May 24, 2017
Cold Hardy and beautiful
susan a on May 23, 2017
i like how pomegranate trees look and this variety survives in my area.
Oleg R on May 23, 2017
I love pomegranates!
Jan G on May 20, 2017
cold hardiness
Senay P on May 19, 2017
I live in cold climate some months out of the year, but have plenty of sunshine on the west side of house. Hoping to have great fruit within a year.
Toni L on May 18, 2017
I already have one and it is a good tree
Teresa D on May 17, 2017
suitable for my climate zone
Rich B on May 17, 2017
health benefits
Lenear B on May 17, 2017
I always wanted to have a Pomegranate tree because they re so beautiful.
We chose the Russian one because although we re living in the South of US it can get very cold here.
Hoping for some fruits
Fred T on May 15, 2017
Have this fruit tree in yard but fruits is very small,
Chandradatt R on May 14, 2017
Cold Hardy and different than the usual Apples and Cherries in the area... never imagined pomegranates in this zone (8) but sure wish there was more fruit options
Mirella P on May 13, 2017
fruit
Edwin F on Apr 26, 2017
Good fruit for good healthful results!
Rodney R on Apr 25, 2017
Pomegranates are delicious, healthy, attractive and easy to grow. The one concern was that they can be adversely affected by low temperatures, which occasionally occur here. This one seems to be excellent in that regard.
Gillian L on Apr 25, 2017
Will be really unique addition to my yard and I like pomegranate juice.
Derek D on Apr 24, 2017
My family enjoys the flavor of pomegranates and so I thought I would I try growing this fruit tree in the Wasatch mountains of Utah, I hope it will grow as you say it will. If this tree grows as you advertise, I will certainly buy more fruit bearing trees from you in the future.
Jared B on Apr 22, 2017
Love pomegranate
Peter M on Apr 22, 2017
ever buy pomegranate at the store $$$ should be a real money saver
JAMES W on Apr 21, 2017
easy to maintain
Malee W on Apr 19, 2017
cold hardy for zone 7
chris on Apr 18, 2017
Nursery promised to be hardy for 6th zone.
Marian W on Apr 16, 2017
Because i could!!
kieth b on Apr 15, 2017
This looks like a beautiful and useful tree. I love the idea that it will bloom after the frosts are over in the spring. What a gorgeous addition to a sunny yard!
Emily R on Apr 13, 2017
Pomegranate in zone 6? I would buy 10 if I have the money.
Thanh d C on Apr 12, 2017
Hardy and delicious
Curtis D on Apr 12, 2017
Will be planting this in my front yard, were pace is limited.
P P on Apr 11, 2017
I love Pomegranates. What can I say. And the potential for this to produce even in our Missouri climate makes it a worthwhile risk.
Jon B on Apr 10, 2017
As a gift.
Joan C on Apr 8, 2017
We love pomegranates, but they are available in groceries only for short time periods and can be expensive. I can't wait to begin growing our own.
Gigi in VB on Apr 8, 2017
I live in Central Texas. I planted two Wonderful variety pomegranates last year and they did not leaf out this spring, so apparently they did not survive the winter. I have another one that's been growing for about 4 years now, and has never produced flowers or fruit. So I read on the internet the Russian variety might be a good choice for my area (although they called it a Russian 18).
Richard K on Apr 7, 2017
Can grow in container
Olga G on Aug 1, 2017
I love pomegranates and when I read that they will grow where I live, I just had to plant one.
George S on Jul 11, 2017
How long after planting for first fruits ? zone 7
Joel S on Nov 23, 2015
BEST ANSWER: Hello Joel,
I just planted my cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate early this fall and I was told I have to wait 2 years before the tree can get first fruits.
The shipping date is shown as July 7th. Is it not too late to plant it in the soil? Do I need to wait until the fall to plant it? (Zone 6)
Diwilliams on Apr 11, 2016
BEST ANSWER: You can plant at anytime.
Can you plant in a large container to bring indoors in the winter? ~Iowa girl
Michelle W on Feb 9, 2016
BEST ANSWER: Yes it can be planted in a container.
When can you plant in zone 6 ?
Rocco D on Oct 13, 2015
BEST ANSWER: This year Spring was warm and early. I planted these trees the first week of April.
Will deer eat them? Ohio girl
Sharon334 on Jan 5, 2016
BEST ANSWER: Deer chewed most of the leaves and tips off of mine the first day I set it out.
How far apart should you plant Russian Pomegranate from each other?
Saima S on Apr 22, 2016
BEST ANSWER: Hello. I grew up in California. There we had many pomegranates. They r very drought tolerant, I believe that they actually prefer dryer soil over moist that way the pomegranates are a lot sweeter. As far as how far to plant them apart, I would say at the most 10 feet But they would be OK if planted evening to 3 feet apart they don't mind if you don't have much room in your yard then I would say probably 6 feet apart should be perfect. You can also control which directions The branches will grow by trimming the ones you don't need. Pomegranate or not he tree so there will be many branches coming out from many different directions. I like to cut those little branches off and make my pomegranate look like a tree have one main storm coming from the ground and two or three coming from that. Now I live in Portland Oregon I bought a Russian hardened party pomegranates hopefully it survives here and bears fruit I know it likes extreme heat and dry conditions so I am worried that there won't be enough time for the pomegranate to ripen before winter rain hits. Hope you have much success with your pomegranates It's a fun tree to grow.
I see that these do well in the cold, how do they do in the heat? I live in Northern Nevada and our temps can range from 3 degrees in the winter to 103 degrees in the summer.
rbinnell r on Mar 16, 2017
BEST ANSWER: I'm in Oklahoma with temp to 115 and they do well, need to water them when hot
Can cold hardy pomegranate pollinate with apples: honeycrisp, low-chill dorsett, or dwarf elberta peach or moorpark apricot tree?
bachamy on Oct 3, 2016
BEST ANSWER: Unfortualey, they will not pollinate apples peach or apricots.
Is this considered a hard, medium, soft seed pomegranate?
Joyohio on Feb 26, 2017
I am in Zone 6, I planted two trees earlier this summer. Is there something I need to do with them for the winter?
Fred M on Aug 15, 2016
BEST ANSWER: I am in NJ, I bought this plant in fall of 2015, it did not survive the winter, I waited and waited, nothing regrew till summer 2016, by the time I called, it has passed the 6mo warranty period, I only got 50% credit to purchase a new one. It arrived okay, I paid extra for one year warranty this time. But really hope it survives the winter as it claims.
How deep is the root system on the Pomegranate tree and can they be panted in a clay soil? (I live in Northern Utah near the Great Salt Lake where the soil is alkaline and clay.)
Jared B on Sep 5, 2016
BEST ANSWER: I live in zone #8 ALA we have clay here, however mine is all organic if you plant in clay you may want to add some sand, I went three time the size of plant took all clay out and went back organic dirt. my bush plant has doubled I say bush they have more than one stem, tree has only one. I hope this helps you.
Will it grow in Michigan weather?
Fred M on May 22, 2017
BEST ANSWER: The growing zones are 6-11. Click the link to look up what growing zone you are in.
http://www.fast-growing-trees.com/USDA-Plant-Hardiness-Zone-Map.htm
cold hardy pomegranate is self polinated or not ?
syed h on Sep 10, 2016
BEST ANSWER: That's what I'm told. I've ask on the Facebook page and was told its self pollinating. It's the first year I've had it. Lots of blooms but nothing yet. The tree itself is growing pretty good. I was told bees and the wind will do but I was also told two is always best to buy two but I only have one tree
How big is the root system for this, i.e., can it be planted near a fence or house foundation?
steph on Sep 9, 2016
BEST ANSWER: I would plant at least 5 feet away from a structure.
Are these organic? The title and description doesn't seem to specifically state so.
Lvmama on Apr 12, 2017
BEST ANSWER: To comply with USDA phytosanitary regulations, we are required to apply a mild chemical treatment to all trees shipped over state lines. This treatment is required to prevent the spread of potentially devastating pathogens from one state to another and is mandatory for all growers. Once your trees arrive, you can use all natural and organic growing techniques to grow organic fruit.
Which pomergranate would flourish on martha's Vineyard Island, Mass.?
Pasodoble8 on Jan 12, 2016
BEST ANSWER: The growing zones are 6-11. Click the link to look up what growing zone you are in.
http://www.fast-growing-trees.com/USDA-Plant-Hardiness-Zone-Map.htm
I planted my tree few years ago.. It has given me plenty of fruit, however, fruits are bitter. I thought may be it will get better but bitterness won't go away. They are so bitter that they can't be enjoyed at all..can u please help??..TIA
shawn on Nov 27, 2016
BEST ANSWER: The membranous wall that is white spongy that separates the compartments are bitter. Picking the fruit to soon can also cause a bitter taste. Some trees will get sweeter as they mature.
Will one tree produce? or will I need two
lovin' papayas on Apr 6, 2016
BEST ANSWER: It is self-fertile, but will produce a better yield of fruit if it has a mate.
We live in zone 6. We want to buy one of these beautiful trees, but we're nervous about harsh winters. Should we let it mature inside for a year then plant in the spring?
Candace W on Jun 22, 2017
BEST ANSWER: I live in Harrisburg/Bressler/Steelton area of Pennsylvania. I bought two Russian pomegranates. They didn't make it through the first winter of 2015/2016, which was a mild winter. Yes, keep them inside.
Can this Russian variety be pollinated by a Wonderful variety? I bought one of each. Thanks
erfon h on May 27, 2017
BEST ANSWER: Yes they are a perfect match for one another!
Are these genetically modified in any way?
Kristina G on Apr 12, 2017
BEST ANSWER: Kistina. with very few exceptions, all food crops are genetically modified by breeding. Trees that looked like this were not living in the wild 5000 years ago. But you are probably asking if they have been genetically *engineered*. I don't know. I couldn't find their origin online anywhere; if you do, and they've been around more than 20 years, it's highly unlikely that they have been.
At what time of year for grow area 7 should you get a tree like this to be established for being outside for winter? February is too cold to put a young tree out and indoor temperatures too hot and dry..All reviews don't mention time of year received per grow area.
master redfox on Feb 9, 2017
BEST ANSWER: Planting in winter/early spring, while they are in their dormant stage helps them get their roots, established without having to give nutrients to the rest of the tree.
In the description it says "harsh Winds" can you give more detail is this because of the cold or damage from wind?
Andy P on Nov 27, 2016
BEST ANSWER: It has been reported the wind tolerance in storms up to 50 mp.
I ordered two Russian pomegranates and they were shipped last Friday. They took a week to get here and the box they arrived in was quite warm. One plant looks pretty good but the other plant has lost all the leaves on most of the branches. Do you think it will survive? Should I plan to them outside now or keep them inside for a few days to recover? Or should I plant them in pots for now and the ground in the fall or spring?
Heather K on Jul 7, 2017
We planted ours two months ago (in zone 6B) and one branch has grown about four inches, one set of new leaves. In other words, it's doing TERRIBLY. We have clay soil so we dug a big deep and wide pit and added a lot of compost to help with drainage and better nutrient availability. Anyone else have clay soil and any success? Should we dig it up and add sand for better drainage?
Andrea H on Jun 12, 2017

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