• Concord Grape for Sale

    Concord Grape for Sale

 

Concord Grape

Reg: $59.90
Save: $29.95  (50%)
$29.95
Ships Tomorrow

1. Size

Size

2. Quantity

3. Extras

-t- Planting Mix
Concord Grape Planting Mix

Helps your Concord Grape get established in a fraction of the time, become more drought tolerant, and grow faster. Here's how:

Beneficial Bacteria... It's like a Probiotic for your tree... creating an explosion of fine hair roots that vastly improves nutrient and water uptake.

Course Organic Compost... loosens and improves all types of soils while promoting proper pH levels. You get better drainage and moisture retention.

Microbial Fertilizers... including Sea Kelp, Yucca, and 100 other elements proven to gently feed your tree without burning the roots.

Use 1 bag of Planting Mix for each plant ordered.


Soil Contents
$6.95
-t- Root Rocket™ Fertilizer
Root Rocket™ Transplant Fertilizer

2oz. Packet

Get your new plants off to the right start by using Root Rocket™ Transplant.

This soil amendment contains 16 strains of mycorrhizal fungi, biostimulants, beneficial bacteria and Horta-Sorb® water management gel.

Simply sprinkle the product into the planting hole adjacent to the root ball when planting.

The organisms will start to work right away supplying the roots with much needed nutrition.

The specially formulated Horta-Sorb® will reduce transplant stress and aid in water retention.

APPLICATION:
1 packet per plant

Root Rocket Fertilizer
$4.95

Growing Zones: 5-9


Growing Zones 5-9 This plant is recommended for zones: 5-9
(green area above)
You are in Growing Zone: 6

Mature Height:

12 ft.

Mature Width:

5-8 ft.

Sunlight:

Full Sun

Drought Tolerance:

Moderate

Botanical Name:

Vitis 'Concord'

Does Not Ship To:

AZ, ID, OR, WA

America's Favorite Juice Grape

The concord is the number one grape for sweet, tangy juice and nutritious snacking. Plus, a new study has shown that grape juice has many of the same health benefits as red wine without the alcohol! And where would a peanut butter and jelly sandwich be without it?

But I've found them difficult to get in supermarkets and produce stands. So I decided to grow my own! These mid-season concords are deep purple, rich and sweet. The vigorous vines are tough and easy to prune for prolific fruit production, too.

The method is simple. Grow them in a 'T' shape along wires or a trellis. Once a year, prune hard and keep pruning. If it doesn't look like you've taken too much, prune some more- all the way back to about a three foot central cane.

I once ran over a concord with the lawnmower and couldn't handle all the grapes it produced the next year!

Just make sure you plant it with plenty of full sun in well-drained soil and you'll be amazed.






Customer Reviews

4.4 / 5.0
14 Reviews
5 Stars
4 Stars
3 Stars
2 Stars
1 Star
8
4
2
0
0
Growth Rate
Slow
Medium
Fast
Hardiness
Tender
 
Hardy
What a nice surprise - quick shipping, carefully packaged, and ready to plant. Size was also much better than expected. I will definitely make more purchases from this company. Finally a grower I can trust
December 31, 2012
Purchased
over 2 years ago
Growth Rate
Slow
Medium
Fast
Hardiness
Tender
 
Hardy
Best time to plant
When is the best time to plant just received them April 2nd, tough winter still expecting below normal temperatures
April 2, 2015
Purchased
1 year ago
Growing Zone:
5
These plants were 5 ft tall or so when delivered and already had clusters of grapes - we were very impressed!! They were planted at our vacation home so hopefully we will get to enjoy eating them when we go back in early July.
December 31, 2012
Purchased
over 4 years ago
The first year I was to prune back my vines, my German Shepherd 'pruned' one of my vines for me. He simply chewed it down to about 5 inches from the ground. The next year my 'pruned' vine produced a most wonderful crop of grapes; however, they rarely make it into the house. They're just too good to wait to eat them inside. Each year after correct pruning the grapes produce a prodigious amount of grapes for me. This year I am hoping that I get to make juice and/or grape conserve
December 31, 2012
Growth Rate
Slow
Medium
Fast
Hardiness
Tender
 
Hardy
Yummy grapes!!!
Vines arrived in excellent condition. Should produce lots of grapes for many years.
July 25, 2015
Purchased
11 months ago
Growing Zone:
8
Growth Rate
Slow
Medium
Fast
Hardiness
Tender
 
Hardy
Be Patient
These vines were well rooted and upon planting, began to produce runners in a week. They do need watering 2-3 times per week for the first growing season. Grapes should appear in 2 years.
July 26, 2015
Purchased
1 year ago
Growth Rate
Slow
Medium
Fast
Hardiness
Tender
 
Hardy
Great grape
I received my grape plants in great shape planted them like the directions said and they started growing right away. Already have grapes on them
July 24, 2015
San antonio, TX
Purchased
11 months ago
Growing Zone:
9
Growth Rate
Slow
Medium
Fast
Hardiness
Tender
 
Hardy
Still nervous
I received this plant and followed instructions to a tee when planting it. Most of the leaves turned a rust color, and over the past few months most of them have been replaced with what appears to be new leaves. As far as growth, it hasn't grown any bigger yet. I am hoping that next year it will grow and produce some grapes.
July 27, 2015
14411, NY
Purchased
1 year ago
Growing Zone:
6
Growth Rate
Slow
Medium
Fast
Hardiness
Tender
 
Hardy
very healthy stock
I planted my grapes almost a week ago and they are already sprouting new foilage...
September 4, 2015
Purchased
10 months ago
Growth Rate
Slow
Medium
Fast
Hardiness
Tender
 
Hardy
Delivery
What a shock! Great looking plants. Cannot wait to see how they end up at end of season. Nice product!
June 9, 2016
Shelbyville, IN
Purchased
1 month ago
Growing Zone:
7

Planting & Care



It's Easy to Plant & Care for Your Concord Grape


Concord Grape Planting Diretions

Choosing a location: Grapes with their ability to grow in many places around the world, are a great addition to any garden. Your grapes will love a sunny place with well-draining soil. The vine will be quite satisfied with six to eight hours of sunlight. Good drainage is required to keep your plant “happy” and a soil pH between 5.0-7.0 is best. Avoid areas with soil that may be heavy with clay. 

Planting Instructions: 

1) Be sure to keep your grape vines moist right up to planting.

2) Dig a small hole about 6 inches wide and 4-6 inches deep. The width of the hole should allow you to spread the roots. If you are planting multiple grape vines dig your holes 6-8 feet apart. In a situation where you have a lot of clay in the soil break up the glazed areas using a shovel.

3) Stand the plant up and carefully pack the soil back into the hole around the vine. Make sure the *graft union is above the soil line by approximately 6 inches. The "graft union" is a lumpy, raised scar that should be just above the surface of the soil. It is caused when the scion and rootstock are united.

4) Water the vine immediately after planting with 3 gallons of water

5) Grapes are essentially a vine that grow upwards along a structure so they will need a "trellis" for proper support and healthy growth. This is typically a wooden structure made of intertwined boards that allow the vines to wrap around them, providing a sturdy support system. 

Do not use a single stake (similar to growing tomato plants) as this won’t provide enough support for your vines once they start growing.

Watering: Water regularly for the first year about 1 inch (1 1/2-2 gallons) a week. Directly moisten the roots but avoid spraying or misting the grapes. After the vines are a bit more established they will seldom need watering and mulch will no longer be necessary. Be watchful for leaf drop, this is a warning sign that you may be over watering. 

Pollination: Most species of grape are self-fertile but a good rule of "green thumb" is to always plant in pairs. Not only will this assure you a healthy yield of fruit but it will also cover the possibility that the grapes need another separate vine to kick start the fruiting process. 

Pruning: Balanced pruning maintains the vine's form, size, vigor, and next season's fruiting wood. Pruning should be done when the vines are dormant in late winter or early spring. Do not prune when vines freeze, because they are brittle and can damage easily. Leaves around the grape clusters can be removed to expose the fruit to sunlight in a short growing season. In your first growing season multiple shoots will begin to grow and the vine may become bushy. Some trim these back to just one or two shoots. Others prefer to let them grow so they may have a better selection to choose from during the following winter's pruning.

During your first dormant pruning you'll select one or two of the best canes and remove all the others. You'll need to remove all lateral canes as well. Your goal is to achieve a balanced vine of just the right amount of leaves to fully ripen the grapes. Too much shade from vigorous leaf growth produces fewer grapes and less desirable grape qualities. 

Fertilizing: Young vines may not need any fertilizer for the first two to three years. If fertilizing is necessary, apply a small amount of 10-10-10 fertilizer two to three weeks after planting, keeping it one foot away from the vine's base. Apply only when vines appear to need it and only in early spring. Excess nitrogen can cause plants to become vegetative and not flower. Too much fertilizer can also cause possible winter damage and delay the coloring and ripening of fruit. Periodic soil testing once a year is highly recommended.

Harvesting: Some species of Grapes will ripen at different times of the year than others. (Example: Concord grapes in late September, Niagara’s mid-season in August-September, and Catawba’s in late September-October). Taste is the best determining factor if it's time to harvest or not. When fruit appears, test its ripeness by picking a few grapes from different areas and tasting them. If the grapes are sweet, start picking as they ready for harvesting and eating.

  • Grapes will not continue to ripen after picking so be sure not to pick them prematurely.
  • Color and size are not necessarily a good indication of ripe fruit. Only pick the fruit after you’ve tasted it and are certain it is ready.

Grapes are certainly a multi-purpose fruit, being used for wine, baked goods, jams, and for eating fresh off the vine. A fantastic plant addition for any fruit lover!


Questions & Answers

Browse 24 questions and 47 answers
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Why did you choose this?
Fast-Growing-Trees.com Store
Good presentation
Reginald B on Jun 13, 2016
grand kids picked out because they love grapes
Katherin K on Apr 14, 2016
Need a partner for a grapevine I already have.
Shirley L on Apr 19, 2016
Because my wife loves grapes.
Mahmoud N on Apr 6, 2016
Do I need to buy 2 for cross pollination?
Deena D on Feb 4, 2015
Best Answer: I have two more waiting for may delivery
Reply · Report · fred d on Apr 23, 2016
When we received our two vines, they each had two branches to start with. One of them has leaves budding on the branches as we expected. (Yay!) But the other has budding leaves down low, do I need to trim them to encourage growth higher up? Or can it just start growing down low and not on the bigger vine branch?
Becky M on Mar 29, 2015
I would like to order 20 concord grape trees for planting in the suburb of chicago during late spring - around first week of May. How far away each one should be planted from others?
RKT chicago on Apr 7, 2015
Best Answer: Plant them 4 feet apart.
Reply · Report · Robyn .Staff on Jan 21, 2016
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (8)
are these grapes seedless?
Victoria on Jun 28, 2014
Best Answer: No these are not seed less
Reply · Report · Justin G on Sep 7, 2014
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (5)
Why do you not ship Concord grape vines to Arizona?
A shopper on Oct 10, 2014
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (3)
How to use transplant fertilizer for Concord grape that I order from fast growing trees and received yesterday?
Irina F on May 3, 2015
Best Answer: Just mix it in with the soil at time of transplant.
Reply · Report · Robyn .Staff on Jan 14, 2016
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (2)
I live in California is it ok to order this plant now and plant it when it arrives or is the summer heat going to be too much to properly transfer it right now?
Marissa F on Jul 18, 2014
Best Answer: Although it's best to plant the Concord Grape in the early Spring or early Fall. However if temperatures aren't scorching hot, around the 90's or above then it will be fine to go ahead and plant now.
Reply · Report · Allison BStaff on Jul 21, 2014
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (2)
Is it too late in the season to plant this in Massachusetts and have it survive?
JAP1284 on Jun 18, 2014
Best Answer: It isn't too late to plant it. You can wait to plant it up until the early Fall even.
Reply · Report · Allison BStaff on Jun 25, 2014
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (2)
Are these seedless concord grapes?
JIM G on Jul 18, 2014
Best Answer: I have never heard of a seedless concord grape. However, the sweetness and taste are well worth eating , inspite of a tiny pit. I regret that I can not get these grapes shipped to me, as I live in Arizona.
Reply · Report · GrammaC on Aug 28, 2014
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (1)
If I plant now (Sept) how long until I get fruit?
Area 9 on Sep 4, 2014
Best Answer: you may get fruit next year, It depends on the vine and the weather conditions. When i planted my vine in late spring, did not get fruit until the following year. The vine had the entire summer and fall to adjust and grow out more.
Reply · Report · Justin G on Sep 7, 2014
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (1)
Why Doesn't this ship to WA?
snail on Sep 17, 2015
Best Answer: Due to agricultural restrictions WA does not allow us to ship any grapes into the state.
Reply · Report · Angela SStaff on Sep 18, 2015
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (1)
Will the 2 year grape vine products grape this year?
Terry on Apr 21, 2016
Best Answer: No, it takes at least 5 years to get a crop. If you are in a big hurry find a local winery and ask for a mature vine that they might be replacing.
Reply · Report · Scott W on Apr 21, 2016
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (0)
I live in Central Fl and it is getting close to Christmas.. It is warm but never know when the cold will hit for a spell. Do I plant now or wait for early spring and if I wait how do I care for the sprouts during the winter months?
Margaret S on Dec 21, 2015
Best Answer: I'm not sure how cold it will get in Florida but I would probably wait till spring. Here in western New York it is sub 0 for 4 or five months straight. I prune the vines in the middle of winter here
Reply · Report · Timothy J on Dec 22, 2015
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I live in South East TN, Growing zone 7, I'm looking for fruit trees that can be grown on deck and/or inside. Can you Please tell me if you have any fruit trees that can be grown this way?
Snookie on Jul 26, 2015
Best Answer: Citrus are great for patio/indoor growing. As mentioned above Avocados will do well also. Just keep in mind they will do best near a sunny window.
Reply · Report · Angela SStaff on Sep 16, 2015
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (0)
Are they seedless?
Patti on Jul 24, 2014
Best Answer: The Concord Grapes I bought are not seedless. I use mine to make jelly and wine. A small tip, you can freeze them and the seeds, outside peal are easily removed. Plus you also get a lot more juice out of the grapes by freezing them.
Reply · Report · Harry W on Jul 24, 2014
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (0)
can i plant this grape in a pot?
maria d on Apr 22, 2016
Best Answer: It's always best to plant in the ground, you could start it pot because of weather conditions, but the root system can be very deep, and large to produce an abundance of fruit.
Good luck
Reply · Report · Arthur G on Apr 23, 2016
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (0)
Will the 2 year vine products grapes this year?
Terry on Apr 21, 2016
Best Answer: Yes, they should produce grapes this year.
Reply · Report · Robyn .Staff on Apr 21, 2016
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (0)
does the concord grape need a pollinator?
Clara N on Oct 19, 2015
Best Answer: The concord grape is self fertile.
Reply · Report · Angela SStaff on Oct 20, 2015
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (0)
What is the best time to plant this gape vine in Reno Nv.?
Michael F on Oct 11, 2015
Best Answer: Since winter is approaching, spring would be a great time
Reply · Report · Robyn .Staff on Oct 16, 2015
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (0)
When is the best time to prune (east coast/Treasure coast Florida zone 9b/10)? - Thanks
Deena D on Feb 3, 2015
Best Answer: Balanced pruning maintains the vine’s form, size, vigor, and next season’s fruiting wood. Pruning should be done when the vines are dormant in late winter or early spring. Do not prune when vines could freeze, because the new growth can be brittle and can damage easily. Leaves around the grape clusters can be removed to expose the fruit to sunlight in a short growing season. During your first growing season multiple shoots will begin to grow and the vine may become bushy. Some trim their plants back to just one or two shoots. Others prefer to let them grow so they may have a better selection to choose from during the following winter’s pruning.
Reply · Report · Robyn .Staff on Jan 29, 2016
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (0)
Where can I buy those concord grapes?
A shopper on Aug 13, 2014
Best Answer: You can buy them from www.fast-growing-trees.com
Reply · Report · Allison BStaff on Aug 22, 2014
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (0)
When is the best time to plant these? Can they be planted in August? I live in northern Maryland.
A shopper on Jul 27, 2014
Best Answer: August would be a good time to plant the Concord Grape. It's best to plant in the early Spring or early Fall, however if your temperatures aren't scorching hot in the 90's or above its fine to go ahead and plant now.
Reply · Report · Allison BStaff on Jul 29, 2014
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (0)
How large are 2 year old vines? Will they produce grapes their first year?
marine123 on May 8, 2016
· Add Answer · I Have This Question Too (0)

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Will trees and shrubs look like the photographs?


Most trees and plants on the website are pictured in their mature form. Depending on the product and growth rate, mature development can take years for your plant to resemble the photos. Picture the last time you took a walk in the woods. The young trees were not miniature bonsai versions of mature trees. Instead they were naturally thin and lanky. Young trees are programmed to race toward the light, before the competing vegetation crowds them out. Once established at 10 feet or more, they start developing a wide canopy and shedding lower limbs.


Trimming & Pruning

Most Trees and Shrubs are Pruned Before Shipping... at No Cost to You!


Pruning makes plants appear to be less-full than the ones you may have seen at your local big box garden center. A retailer's goal is to have plants look their best while sitting in the store. Our goal is to have them look the best after you plant them.

Pruned trees and shrubs not only travel better, but become established much quicker. So rather than supporting extra foliage, they put their energy into sending out deep roots. Once that happens, your plants become hardier and quickly explode with new top growth. Above the ground, pruning helps your plants develop a more attractive form.