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  • Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate for Sale

    Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate for Sale

    Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate for Sale

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Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate

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Growing Zones: 6-11



Growing Zones 6-11
This plant is recommended for zones: 6-11
(green area above)

You are in Growing Zone: 6

Mature Height:

8-10 ft.

Mature Width:

8-10 ft.

Sunlight:

Full Sun

Drought Tolerance:

Moderate

Chill Hours:

100-200

Botanical Name:

Punica granatum

Does Not Ship To:

AZ

90-100 lbs of Pomegranates & Thrives almost Everywhere!

Russian Red is the best Pomegranate for the North, but also most of the South! Organic fruit orchards from Florida all the way up to Pennsylvania are amazed at how tough and trouble-free this tree is.

You get reliable fruit harvests in good years and bad. There are several Poms that will grow in Northern climates. Problem is... most are early bloomers. They can set fruit, only to be wiped out by sporadic late freezes. Many Southern states are prone to this as well.

Russian Red flowers later so you don't have to worry about late freezes. Thrives in zones 6-11. But will also produce in mild zone 6 areas that are protected from harsh winds. Far Northern states (zones 3-5) can plant their Poms in pots and bring indoors for the winter.

One of the Biggest harvests of any Pomegranate Tree. A mature tree can produce up to 90-100 lbs under good conditions (your results may vary). So with very little space you get plenty of fruit to eat, share, and juice.

Enjoy the health benefits of your Pomegranates all year long. Eat fresh fruit over 4 months in the fall and freeze the juice for the remainder of the year. Plant a hedge row, of Russian Reds, every 8 ft along your property border, so you'll never run out. At $3.00 a pound for organic pomegranates, you could trim them into a highly lucrative privacy fence.

One of the best tasting Pomegranates. Many people mistake Russian Red fruit for the Wonderful variety found in grocery stores. If you're a Pom Connoisseur you'll find Russian Red to be slightly sweeter.

Bigger fruit means less work. Russian Reds are large... about the size of a Grapefruit. So you get a lot more arils for the same effort. Up until now, the 'easy to grow' varieties have tended to have small fruit and not much of it.

A No-Fuss Tree that stands up to High Humidity. Fungus is the arch enemy of pomegranates. Unusually heavy weeks of rain in spring or late summer can cause problems for many poms. This can happen in most areas of the country and happens almost every year in the South-Eastern states. Russian Red is highly tolerant of humidity.

This is the closest you can come to Plant It... Forget It... Pick It. A remarkably tough tree that also resists insects, disease, drought and fruit splitting. Prefers full sun but can tolerate partial shade. Adapts to almost any soil, even poor ones as long as they drain well (avoid consistently soggy areas).

You need only one Russian Red to produce fruit, but you'll greatly increase production with a second. This is a must if you're going to get close to 90-100 lbs per tree per year. You can cross pollinate with additional Russian Reds or Wonderfuls.

Order Now before we sell out for the season. This tree is growing in popularity with organic orchards who buy in large numbers. We recommend that you place your order before we sell out for the season.





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Customer Reviews

4.6 / 5.0
16 Reviews
5 Stars
4 Stars
3 Stars
2 Stars
1 Star
10
6
0
0
0
Growth Rate
Slow
Medium
Fast
Hardiness
Tender
 
Hardy
Nice Plants
They arrived well packed and looking healthy. We planted them immediately and one started putting on new leaves in just a couple of days. Since they were planted about a week ago we will need to give them time to judge their growth rate and if they are hardy enough to tolerate the cold North Georgia winters
October 6, 2015
Purchased
1 year ago
Beautiful tree
We live in Western North Carolina, on the very top of a mountain where our winters are often brutal. If our tree makes it, I'll happily order several more. Our Pomegranate tree arrived a couple of days ago, and it was well-packed and hydrated. It looked very healthy, and there were many leaves on the tree as well. I was quite surprised at the size of the tree, since it was larger than I thought it would be. It also had small red flowers on it. I can't wait to see how it does. I can't judge the growth rate or hardiness just yet, but will keep you informed.
April 7, 2016
Growing Zone:
6
Growth Rate
Slow
Medium
Fast
Hardiness
Tender
 
Hardy
Arrived in excellent condition. Now thriving.
Arrived healthy in good condition. Both adjusted to full sun immediately and are already sending out new growth. They will be going into the ground soon. Zone 6B.
On the day they arrived before being planted outside.
On the day they arrived before being planted outside.
July 23, 2016
Lowell, AR
Purchased
5 months ago
Growing Zone:
6
Growth Rate
Slow
Medium
Fast
Hardiness
Tender
 
Hardy
The pomegranate tree you sent me
So far this tree is doing very well. It has even produced a couple of blooms. Even during transportation it remained intact, also due to the fact that you take all kinds of pains to pack the plants adequately. Thank you for your wonderful service.
April 27, 2016
Savannah, GA
Purchased
1 year ago
Growing Zone:
8
Growth Rate
Slow
Medium
Fast
Hardiness
Tender
 
Hardy
Super pomegranat.
Thank you very much ,shipping very good, pomegranat plant looks super, ivery hoppy.
April 25, 2016
Spokane, WA
Purchased
7 months ago
Growing Zone:
5
Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate
I bought this tree and was shipped together with a Lemon tree. It arrived fast, well secured and packaged. It had the right ordered size with very healthy and vibrant leaves. I've already planted it in ground and hope it will continue to grow, bare fruits, and survive our growing zone 6 weather. This is my 3rd tree ordered from this reputable nursery and I surely recommend it to all. I'm so far 100% satisfied.
July 27, 2016
Bridgewater, NJ
Purchased
5 months ago
Growing Zone:
6
Growth Rate
Slow
Medium
Fast
Beautifull tree and healthy . I am so happy . Thanks
Added Aug 16, 2016
August 16, 2016
43040, OH
Purchased
5 months ago
Growing Zone:
6
Pleasantly surprised!
Recently received my Cold Hardy Russian Pomegranate in the mail. I was pleased with the size and how pretty this tree is. So far, so good. I am excited to see if it will have fruit on it this year. I ordered a 5-in-1 pear tree, a 5-in-1 apple tree and an apricot tree last year and this year they are so much fuller and had so many blossoms. It takes about a year for a tree to get established, and I am certain that a year from now my wonderful pomegranate will be even more beautiful.
May 4, 2016
Port Washington, NY
Purchased
9 months ago
Growing Zone:
7
Growth Rate
Slow
Medium
Fast
Hardiness
Tender
 
Hardy
Good so far
I bought this plant three weeks ago. It has new leaves and survived in hot temperatures up to 83F. Happy with the plant. Thank you fast growing trees.com for your good service.
May 19, 2016
Canton, GA
Purchased
7 months ago
Growing Zone:
7
Growth Rate
Slow
Medium
Fast
Hardiness
Tender
 
Hardy
Doing great
Amazing how it is arrived and is growing. Thank you!
June 4, 2016
Cedar Creek, TX
Purchased
7 months ago
Growing Zone:
8

Planting & Care



It's Easy to Plant & Care for Your Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate



Step 1: Dig Your Hole


Select a site with full to partial sun and moist or well drained soil for your Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate.

First, dig each hole so that it is just shallower than the root ball and at least twice the width.

Then loosen the soil in the planting hole so the roots can easily break through.

Use your shovel or try dragging the points of a pitch fork along the sides and bottom of the hole.

Planting & Care

Step 2: Place Your Plant


Next, separate the roots of your Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate gently with your fingers and position them downward in the hole.

The top of the root flare, where the roots end and the trunk begins, should be about an inch above the surrounding soil.

Then make sure the plant is exactly vertical in the hole.

To make it just right, use a level.

Step 3: Backfill Your Hole


As you backfill the hole, apply water to remove air pockets.

Remove debris like stones and grass and completely break up any dirt clumps.

Water your Cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate again after the transplant is complete.


Questions & Answers

Start typing your question and we'll check if it was already asked and answered. Learn More
Browse 16 questions Browse 16 questions and 80 answers
Why did you choose this?
Fast-Growing-Trees.com Store
Looking for a Cold Hardy Pomegranate for northern NC piedmont area. The Russian Red seems like a favorite choice for this area.
Ron H on Nov 28, 2016
Very few fruit trees grow in zone 6, and Pomegranate fruit is loaded with antioxidants!
Shery E on Oct 27, 2016
Looking for a Cold Hardy Pomegranate for northern NC piedmont area. The Russian Red seems like a favorite choice for this area.
Ron H on Nov 28, 2016
I am hoping for healthy fruit and a cold hearty tree that can withstand the winter.
Paul S on Nov 22, 2016
Very few fruit trees grow in zone 6, and Pomegranate fruit is loaded with antioxidants!
Shery E on Oct 27, 2016
my other tree needs a mate. this one is supposed to be sweeter. we will see.
don s on Oct 27, 2016
We love pomegranate and the health advantages.
Lisa S on Oct 23, 2016
Because it has healthy and tasty fruits, pretty flowers, and good meaning (prosperous and, for women, fruitful). Well, because I had it in my home town. It brings back childhood memories. :-)
Yunli J on Oct 21, 2016
Patio container cultivar
Don P on Oct 18, 2016
I wanted them
Rick H on Oct 16, 2016
Already previously bought one of these Russian Red Pomegranate trees and planted it months ago.It is growing great here on the gulf coast even in very hot weather conditions with very little care except watering.Really like low maintenance plants like this.Looking forward to getting some very healthy pomegranate fruit off this tree in the future.
william j on Oct 14, 2016
I wanted a pomagranet that will grow in zone 7
Larissa Z on Oct 8, 2016
i tried regular pomegranate in my back yard last year but it is died from the cold weather of brooklyn new York
Haroun K on Oct 4, 2016
hard freeze 25 degree killed my two plants,will try these cold hardy
Adolph M on Oct 3, 2016
trying something new for northern florida
celeste c on Oct 1, 2016
Pomegranates are so expensive these days. Therefore, if we can grow our own it just makes sense. In bad times they may be the only source of much needed nutrients
Lynn M on Sep 30, 2016
In my part of virginia we have surprise cold snaps after spring has sprung. I liked that this was described as cold hardy and late bloomer.
john a on Sep 26, 2016
Just had a pomegranate given to me from my friend. This was shipped to her from California. We were wondering if we could grow pomegranates here in Kentucky. So, looked up cold hardy pomegranate trees, and here I am.
gina a on Sep 23, 2016
Great healthy plant. I buy this all the time for my drinks and smoothies It will help greatly to have it in my backyard.
Isaac E on Sep 22, 2016
We are placing this tree at the entrance of a prayer garden. The Biblical symbolism of the plant (used extensively through the Exodus narrative and as a symbol of God's Blessing and fruitfullness) will be an inviting accent for the mood of this small garden.
Joseph B on Sep 21, 2016
to grow my own pomegranate so I don't have to go to the store.
michael b on Sep 19, 2016
I love them!
Denise D on Sep 17, 2016
I chose this tree for the fruit bearing potential and the reported cold hardiness.
Shaun S on Sep 10, 2016
I love the flowers
george j on Sep 8, 2016
Died as soon As I took them out of the pot upon arrival the next day and put on the ground it died. I am very upset. But no answer from you guys yet.
Hugo F on Sep 6, 2016
wonted pomegranate tree which would require little care to grow
janice m on Sep 4, 2016
Did not think I could grow pomegranates in my zone, My husband loves them so it will be great to have them available in my own yard
Debra N on Sep 4, 2016
Cold hardy and can grow in. Large container :)
Thea m on Aug 29, 2016
Just moved to Idaho and am missing the fruit trees I had in So Cal. I have a large indoor green house in our new home.
Diana S on Aug 23, 2016
I like figs and pomegranate with Chicago weather i am going to enjoy then
Stefano C on Aug 18, 2016
I was very surprised to notice a pomegranate tree on your web site that would grow in zone 7, so I must try it. I ordered 2 large plants, so wish me luck.
Janette P on Aug 16, 2016
I think it is a good choice for me. I choice it because have good view and good description . First time buying from fast growing, hope can get best quality. also the good about it is you can grow it in pot and you still can get lots produces. They are growing from the seed. you can save lots time to get the produce.
william k on Aug 13, 2016
Indicated as zone 6 tolerant.
Richard M on Aug 13, 2016
Health reasons
I love pomegranates. My family has always grown these trees.
Susan C on Aug 6, 2016
Antioxident benefits and cold hardyness.
Mary Ann A on Aug 5, 2016
love pomegranates did not think I could grow them in Tennessee
darla g on Aug 3, 2016
BECAUSE OF PROMISED HEIGHT WHEN MATURE, SHORTER TIME TO SET FRIUT, AND THE PROMISE OF THRIVING IN NOT SO FERTILE SOIL, NOT TO LEAVE OUT ITS WINTER HARTINESS.
WALTER L on Jul 31, 2016
love to eat them
Liliana F on Jul 26, 2016
I get enough cold hours where this plant will survive and produce whether the climate gets warmer or cooler which seems relevant these days with extreme weather events. A secure food source is important to me in my golden years. Also having pomegranates brings a diversity in food items that is important in overall nutritional benefits.
donald c on Jul 19, 2016
I like growing fruit trees and I like pomegranates. I saw that it was cold hardy and decided to try growing it.
barbara f on Jul 17, 2016
Lets see if this will survives the winter ..
Fanila R on Jul 11, 2016
We are trying to grow a variety of our own fresh fruits and it really is a very pretty tree.
Leigh D on Jul 9, 2016
I selected this product for ease of care and it's health benefits.
william c on Jul 1, 2016
HELLO. I READ GOOD REVEIW SO I CHOOSE THIS STOR SO PLEASE SEND ME HEALTHY PLANT.THANKS
sukhwant k on Jun 29, 2016
I and my kids love to eat pomegranates, I hope this can grow in our zone.
Anthony M on Jun 25, 2016
want a different fruit tree
Rae L on Jun 13, 2016
Really wanted to try growing plus we love pomegranate
Joanne T on Jun 9, 2016
Wanted to see if this tree could thrive through New England Winter, and because I love pomegranate and not willing to shell out $5 for a fruit. And the fact that this tree fruit could last up to 7 month is a bonus during winter months. Pomegranate all year round?!!
Mao L on Apr 20, 2016
This looks like a great choice. Very unique kind. I will be happy when it arrives. I have 2 other varieties of pomegranate trees. This will join them.
Sharlene M on Apr 17, 2016
I grew up with a pomegranate tree in the backyard. After moving to the Midwest, I missed having one. Glad to see that there is one that will grow in zone 6.
Antonia R on Apr 17, 2016
I chose this because they grow so well
Liz W on Apr 16, 2016
I am hoping for healthy fruit and a cold hearty tree that can withstand the winter.
Paul S on Nov 22, 2016
my other tree needs a mate. this one is supposed to be sweeter. we will see.
don s on Oct 27, 2016
How long after planting for first fruits ? zone 7
Joel S on Nov 23, 2015
BEST ANSWER: Hello Joel,
I just planted my cold Hardy Russian Red Pomegranate early this fall and I was told I have to wait 2 years before the tree can get first fruits.
The shipping date is shown as July 7th. Is it not too late to plant it in the soil? Do I need to wait until the fall to plant it? (Zone 6)
Diwilliams on Apr 11, 2016
BEST ANSWER: You can plant at anytime.
Can you plant in a large container to bring indoors in the winter? ~Iowa girl
Michelle W on Feb 9, 2016
BEST ANSWER: Yes it can be planted in a container.
When can you plant in zone 6 ?
Rocco D on Oct 13, 2015
BEST ANSWER: This year Spring was warm and early. I planted these trees the first week of April.
How far apart should you plant Russian Pomegranate from each other?
Saima S on Apr 22, 2016
BEST ANSWER: Hello. I grew up in California. There we had many pomegranates. They r very drought tolerant, I believe that they actually prefer dryer soil over moist that way the pomegranates are a lot sweeter. As far as how far to plant them apart, I would say at the most 10 feet But they would be OK if planted evening to 3 feet apart they don't mind if you don't have much room in your yard then I would say probably 6 feet apart should be perfect. You can also control which directions The branches will grow by trimming the ones you don't need. Pomegranate or not he tree so there will be many branches coming out from many different directions. I like to cut those little branches off and make my pomegranate look like a tree have one main storm coming from the ground and two or three coming from that. Now I live in Portland Oregon I bought a Russian hardened party pomegranates hopefully it survives here and bears fruit I know it likes extreme heat and dry conditions so I am worried that there won't be enough time for the pomegranate to ripen before winter rain hits. Hope you have much success with your pomegranates It's a fun tree to grow.
How deep is the root system on the Pomegranate tree and can they be panted in a clay soil? (I live in Northern Utah near the Great Salt Lake where the soil is alkaline and clay.)
Jared B on Sep 5, 2016
BEST ANSWER: I live in zone #8 ALA we have clay here, however mine is all organic if you plant in clay you may want to add some sand, I went three time the size of plant took all clay out and went back organic dirt. my bush plant has doubled I say bush they have more than one stem, tree has only one. I hope this helps you.
Can cold hardy pomegranate pollinate with apples: honeycrisp, low-chill dorsett, or dwarf elberta peach or moorpark apricot tree?
bachamy on Oct 3, 2016
BEST ANSWER: Unfortualey, they will not pollinate apples peach or apricots.
Will deer eat them? Ohio girl
Sharon334 on Jan 5, 2016
BEST ANSWER: They are seldom eaten by deer.
How big is the root system for this, i.e., can it be planted near a fence or house foundation?
steph on Sep 9, 2016
BEST ANSWER: Best place to plant is full sun at front yard. In Korean culture if you plant pomegranate to front yard it will brings a good luck, and wealth to your children and generation to come. so far it's ture. My parents havery it and all five of us are very successful and have great life. C.Elley
cold hardy pomegranate is self polinated or not ?
syed h on Sep 10, 2016
BEST ANSWER: That's what I'm told. I've ask on the Facebook page and was told its self pollinating. It's the first year I've had it. Lots of blooms but nothing yet. The tree itself is growing pretty good. I was told bees and the wind will do but I was also told two is always best to buy two but I only have one tree
I am in Zone 6, I planted two trees earlier this summer. Is there something I need to do with them for the winter?
Fred M on Aug 15, 2016
BEST ANSWER: I am in NJ, I bought this plant in fall of 2015, it did not survive the winter, I waited and waited, nothing regrew till summer 2016, by the time I called, it has passed the 6mo warranty period, I only got 50% credit to purchase a new one. It arrived okay, I paid extra for one year warranty this time. But really hope it survives the winter as it claims.
Which pomergranate would flourish on martha's Vineyard Island, Mass.?
Pasodoble8 on Jan 12, 2016
BEST ANSWER: The growing zones are 6-11. Click the link to look up what growing zone you are in.
http://www.fast-growing-trees.com/USDA-Plant-Hardiness-Zone-Map.htm
I planted my tree few years ago.. It has given me plenty of fruit, however, fruits are bitter. I thought may be it will get better but bitterness won't go away. They are so bitter that they can't be enjoyed at all..can u please help??..TIA
shawn on Nov 27, 2016
BEST ANSWER: The membranous wall that is white spongy that separates the compartments are bitter. Picking the fruit to soon can also cause a bitter taste. Some trees will get sweeter as they mature.
Will one tree produce? or will I need two
lovin' papayas on Apr 6, 2016
BEST ANSWER: It is self-fertile, but will produce a better yield of fruit if it has a mate.
In the description it says "harsh Winds" can you give more detail is this because of the cold or damage from wind?
Andy P on Nov 27, 2016
BEST ANSWER: It has been reported the wind tolerance in storms up to 50 mp.

Shipping Details

Most items ship the next business day unless otherwise noted


Shipping Alert:

Due to cold weather, we have suspended shipping to the areas that are shaded on the map below. Please view the diagram to determine if your area has been affected. This includes anyone in Growing Zones 2, 3 4, 5 or 6. If you are unsure of your growing zone, visit our Growing Zone Finder.

We will resume normal shipping in the Spring. Please see the table below for your approximate ship date.


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